Music streaming from websites such as Spotify to help dictate UK singles chart | Music | The Guardian

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The chief executive of the Official Charts Company, Martin Talbot, said this was a natural development to reflect to the changing ways the public now access music. He said: “The singles chart in the UK has always been purely based on the sales of singles, whether it be downloads or CDs or cassettes or even 7in vinyl, so broadening that for the first time to incorporate audio streams is a significant event. The chart has always evolved over 50 years to incorporate lots of different formats and the different ways people consume music and I suppose this is part of this evolution.

via Music streaming from websites such as Spotify to help dictate UK singles chart | Music | The Guardian.

 

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The sound of silence: LA band raises $20,000 through Spotify without recording a note – News – Music – The Independent

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Mr Stratton and his bandmates Theo Katzman, Woody Goss and Joe Dart have released three previous albums as Vulfpeck. Sleepify consists of 10 tracks with titles including “Z”, “Zzz” and “Zzzzzz”. Spotify’s average rate for royalties is $0.007 per track streamed, and a song must be played for at least 30 seconds to register.

All the tracks on Sleepify clock in at 31 or 32 seconds; an eight-hour night of continuous streams could thus generate more than $5 in royalties.

via The sound of silence: LA band raises $20,000 through Spotify without recording a note – News – Music – The Independent.

The Download Hits Middle Age (and It Shows) | Billboard

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The digital download hit middle age in 2013. Although retirement may be far in the future, the download is getting pushed aside as consumers opt to experience music in other ways.

Digital purchases are down almost across the board this year. Track sales are down 4.4% through Nov. 24, according to Nielsen SoundScan. Track-equivalent albums, where 10 tracks equal one album, are down 2.1%. Total digital purchases — tracks and digital albums — are down 4%.

Track sales have been falling all year. In the first half of 2013, U.S. consumers bought between 23 million and 25 million tracks per week. In October and November, weekly track sales dropped below 20 million.

Read more The Download Hits Middle Age (and It Shows) | Billboard.

via daringfireball

“Sexism in the music industry ain’t nothing new.” Why aren’t female artists getting their due? – FACT Magazine: Music News, New Music.

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Knowles is not alone in not receiving credit where credit is due. Claire Boucher, who is single-handedly reinvigorating pop music as Grimes, faces similar challenges. Despite being credited as the sole writer and producer of her three albums, Boucher has been dogged by sexism, taking to her Tumblr last week to address a variety of grievances, from press faux pas to sexual harassment. Standing out from the list was a castigation of men who dismiss her skills as a musician.

via “Sexism in the music industry ain’t nothing new.” Why aren’t female artists getting their due? – FACT Magazine: Music News, New Music..

Artists who sell more than 850,000 in the first week

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What does Justin Timberlake have in common with the following:

  • 50 Cent
  • Kanye West
  • Lil Wayne
  • Taylor Swift
  • Lady Gaga

? The answer is that they are the only music acts who have managed to push past 850,000 sales in the week of an album’s release in the past 8 years. This is according to Billboard, who are reporting that Timberlake’s latest release is pushing towards the 900,000 figure.

Thus, since 2005, there have just been eight weeks where an album did 850,000-plus. All seven of them did so in their debut frames: 50 Cent’s “The Massacre” (1.14 million; March 19, 2005), Kanye West’s “Late Registration” (860,000; Sept. 17, 2005), West’s “Graduation” (957,000; Sept. 29, 2007), Lil Wayne’s “Tha Carter III” (1.01 million; June 28, 2008), Taylor Swift’s “Speak Now” (1.05 million; Nov. 13, 2010), Lady Gaga’s “Born This Way” (1.11 million, June 11, 2011), Lil Wayne’s “Tha Carter IV” (964,000; Sept. 17, 2011) and Swift’s “Red” (1.21 million; Nov. 10, 2012).

via Justin Timberlake’s ’20/20′ Pushes Towards 900,000 for Debut Week | Billboard.

Autotune: Everybody Uses It

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Good read from The Verge on the scourge of Autotune.

Everybody uses it

“I’ll be in a studio and hear a singer down the hall and she’s clearly out of tune, and she’ll do one take,” says Drew Waters of Capitol Records. That’s all she needs. Because they can fix it later, in Auto-Tune.

There is much speculation online about who does — or doesn’t — use Auto-Tune. Taylor Swift is a key target, as her terribly off-key duet with Stevie Nicks at the 2010 Grammys suggests she’s tone deaf. (Label reps said at the time something was wrong with her earpiece.) But such speculation is naïve, say the producers I talked to. “Everybody uses it,” says Filip Nikolic, singer in the LA-based band, Poolside, and a freelance music producer and studio engineer. “It saves a ton of time.”

via Seduced by ‘perfect’ pitch: how Auto-Tune conquered pop music | The Verge.